Breastfeeding taskforce

Pandemic-interrupted breastfeeding lessons for new moms: study

According to research, mothers were less likely to breastfeed during the pandemic due to a lack of in-person help. The redeployment of childminders and containment measures have disrupted breastfeeding classes in nurseries.

Women struggled to get professional support as the coronavirus crisis gripped the world, say scientists in a study that was presented at a meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics in Anaheim, California .

Lead author Dr Amy Yeh, a pediatrician at the University of Southern California (USC), explained: “There is a false belief that breastfeeding is a natural instinct that is supposed to happen out of thin air. .”

“Breastfeeding is a skill that both mother and baby must learn. Every mother, baby, and dad is unique. It’s about picking up cues from the baby and figuring out what works for mother and baby. It becomes easier with Remember: Breastmilk is gold.

Midwife Anna Ruocco (L) provides home breastfeeding assistance to a mother with her newborn baby, June 17, 2022, in Turin, Italy. New mothers struggled to get professional support as the coronavirus crisis gripped the world, scientists say.
Diana Bagnoli/Getty Images

The research team found that exclusive breastfeeding and breastfeeding decreased by 11 and 4 percent, respectively, compared to before.

An analysis of rates at LAC (Los Angeles County) and USC Medical Center from January 2019 to April 2021 identified declines in all demographic groups.

Hospital staff and access to breastfeeding training and other health care due to restrictions were potential causes.

This follows a Swansea University study which showed almost a third of mothers in the UK gave up before they wanted to during lockdown.

“Although a task force was set up in our nursery immediately following this study to bring breastfeeding rates back to normal for our communities, many mothers and newborns missed the opportunity to benefit from the effects. breastfeeding during the pandemic,” said Dr Yeh.

It stimulates the development of infants and reduces their risk of allergies and infections. Breast milk has also been linked to improvements in IQ.

Breastfeeding also helps protect women against breast and ovarian cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

“Although a task force was set up in our nursery immediately following this study to bring breastfeeding rates back to normal for our communities, many mothers and newborns missed the opportunity to benefit from the effects. breastfeeding during the pandemic,” said Dr Yeh.

“This is in addition to the many health impacts of COVID-19 on families,” she said. The World Health Organization recommends that babies be exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months of life.

Produced in association with SWNS Talker.

This story was provided to Newsweek by Zenger News.