Breastfeeding laws

What are the breastfeeding laws in other countries? A distribution of nursing around the world

American women have fought long and hard for breastfeeding rights. Even today you will still hear stories of mothers being ashamed of breastfeeding their children. Fortunately, the majority of this country protects breastfeeding mothers, giving them the right to breastfeed their children in public. Most American workplaces allow their breastfeeding employees to pump at work, and many public buildings have breastfeeding rooms available for a mother’s convenience. But, if you are a breastfeeding mother and you are traveling or even moving to another country, you will want to find out about breastfeeding laws in other countries.

It’s important to know what to expect and how to follow local laws when you’re abroad. Many foreign governments apply regulations based on religious and cultural beliefs, which may be very different from what you are used to here in the United States. Some cultures may value breastfeeding, but view breastfeeding in public as indecent. Other cultures may have such a deep-rooted history of breastfeeding that mothers feed their babies anywhere and everywhere without a second thought.

Organizations such as La Leche League International and Save The Children are doing their part around the world to educate about the importance of breastfeeding. Here are some of the breastfeeding laws you will find in other countries.

1

United Arab Emirates

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3

Brazil

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4

Norway

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5

Philippines

In the Philippines, the Extended Breastfeeding Promotion Act of 2009 requires workplaces to provide a lactation station for breastfeeding mothers. Nursing mothers are entitled to work lactation periods, requiring a minimum of 40 minutes of lactation break for each eight-hour work period, which can be split throughout the day.

6

Pakistan

Pakistan has enacted the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Breastfeeding and Child Nutrition Protection Act 2015, which Save the Children says requires infant formula manufacturers to write prominently on their containers in bold print “Breast milk is best for your baby and helps prevent diarrhea and other illnesses.” The law also prohibits health workers from promoting any bottled or packaged milk to infants up to age of twelve months.

seven

Greece

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According to the International Baby Food Action Network, Greek law offers breastfeeding mothers a form of “breastfeeding leave”. In the country, working mothers are entitled to one of the following benefits:

  • Work one hour less per day for the same salary for the first 30 months after the end of maternity leave.
  • Work two hours less per day for the same salary for the first 12 months after the end of maternity leave and one hour less for the following six months
  • Extension of three and a half months of maternity leave instead of working less daily.
  • A breastfeeding mother has the right not to perform night duty until her child reaches the age of 12 months or she is entitled to leave with full pay.

8

Argentina

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9

Britain

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